Marketing to Millennials : Understanding the Changing Rules

Marketing to Millennials : Understanding the Changing Rules

As the buying power of millennials grows, marketers have worked diligently to capture the attention of these consumers. The habits of these buyers differ to the patterns once observed in the generations before them, however, making it vitally important for small businesses to experiment with innovative advertising and marketing techniques. In the United States alone, millennials account for some 76.6 million individuals, making it imperative to focus on courting their pocketbooks.

The Power of Choice

Before the advent of the Internet, buyers were extremely limited in their options. Millennials have grown up surrounded by choices, however, with myriad brands and businesses competing for their attention. In the average millennial buyer, this has created an expectation of multiple price points and variations of the same products or services.

Shifting social pressures and unstable economic environments have further altered the traditional marketing model, as millennials pursue different paths in adulthood. Whereas baby boomers were marrying and having children in their early twenties, many millennials take things more slowly. Some of these buyers still live at home with their parents, while others are singletons pursuing high-level careers without the added responsibilities of domestic life. Catering to the various segments within the millennial population is a challenging equation.

Examining Wants & Desires

Marketers have always worked to address the wants and desires of buyers, often creating a perceived need even when one does not exist. In a report compiled by global insight firm CEB, businesses were found to be more successful with millennials when they embraced three key marketing strategies: understanding the audience’s values, realistically assessing the buyer’s spending power and lifestyle, and “involving” these consumers, as opposed to simply selling a product.

Real-world applications of these strategies are particularly evident in the hospitality industry, with restaurants working to cater to the millennial crowd. Millennials are more apt to spend time eating out with friends, as they’re not limited by spouses and young children. Furthermore, these buyers are on the hunt for a multitude of choices, as evidenced by the popularity of services like Yelp, which highlight a number of businesses operating in any given area. To answer this need, many chefs work on creating new menus at varying price points, which can help keep young buyers engaged with the brand.

Life will be changing rapidly for millennials in the years to come, as many of these young adults begin to settle down and establish families of their own. Marketing trends experts still believe millennials will be driven by a desire for plenty of options, however, and the core values of these buyers will likely remain constant. Because the nature of the millennial marketing game is evolving, it’s important for small businesses to carefully monitor the situation and not feel hesitant about trying various techniques to see what works best.

The Power of Business Blogging: Why You Need to Start Today

No matter whether you’re an established brand or a budding startup, using a blog to grow your business could lead to dramatic growth for your company. Consider this simple fact: brands that create 15 blog posts a month average a whopping 1,200 new leads in that period. (source) With statistics like those, it’s hard to overlook the hidden potential business blogging offers. Looking for even more benefits? Consider the following six reasons business blogging simply makes sense.

1. Blogging Leads to More Followers

According to Twitter, interesting content is one of the top reasons users follow brands on social media. As a social media marketer, you’re competing with billion-dollar companies, entertainment conglomerates, and every other business tweeting around the clock. Without content that resonates, you’ll struggle to gain any traction. Start blogging and watch the visitors come knocking on your door.

2. Companies with Blogs Receive 97% More Links

Getting others to share the word about your business is an important goal, and few techniques are as effective as creating a blog. In fact, research suggests that companies with blogs receive 97% more links than sites with static content—that’s nearly twice as many inbound links.

3. Blogging Makes a Long-term Impact

When it comes to spending your marketing dollars, it’s important to consider the overall return on your investment. Whereas PPC campaigns and other advertising initiatives only influence immediate traffic, blogs can pull in new visitors for years to come. Focus on creating “evergreen content”—content that is not time-sensitive—to maximize your blog’s potential.

4. Frequent Posts Impact Your Search Ranking

Appearing higher in the results on a popular search engine is about much more than vanity. The higher your site ranks for a particular keyword, the more likely a web user will click your link. Frequently posting encourages search bots to index your site, while the ranking algorithms use factors like the number of active posts to determine site authority.

5. Small Businesses with Blogs Generate More Leads

Thinking blogging only makes sense for big brands with thousands of active followers? Think again. Research shows that small businesses with blogs generate up to 126% more leads, as opposed to businesses that neglect online marketing altogether. Can you think of a single reason not to double your leads with a blog?

6. New Content Keeps Users Engaged

Attracting an audience online is a tricky equation that requires plenty of hard work. Pulling new visitors to your site is only half the equation; you also must work on keeping their attention. Routinely publishing new content helps keep your followers interested in what you have to say, which in turn affects the overall health of your business.

How to Write an RFP for a Website Redesign

So, you need a to find an agency to manage your website redesign, but you don’t know how to weed through the endless array of development firms vying for your marketing dollars. Choosing the right option for your redesign shouldn’t feel like an impossible mission, but many small business owners find it downright overwhelming. Writing an RFP, or request for proposal, will help you narrow down the solutions available to you.

Ready to get started? Use the tips below to write an effective RFP that will save you both time and money.

What Should My RFP Include?

Many entrepreneurs wonder if writing an RFP is even worth the effort when it’s relatively easy to ask for a quote from a web designer. The short answer is a resounding yes! An RFP will ensure you receive the best product at a competitive price.

Your RFP should perform a few different functions. Firstly, it announces your intent to compare a firm’s quote against its competitors. This gives you a headstart on the negotiation process before it even begins. The RFP also outlines the expectations and needs of the project, ensuring no wires are crossed down the road. RFPs detail the scope of a project, explore the limitations of your existing site and include your requirements for the submitted proposal. Finally, an RFP must reference budget information.

Provide the Right Context

Unless you’re a budding web developer in your own right, you’re probably more familiar with your goals than the solutions your website should use. Instead of providing a laundry list of “must have” features, use your RFP to explain what you’re looking for and why. By giving the recipient some flexibility, you may find you receive better suggestions and recommendations.

Keep the Right Perspective

While it may be true that the buying power rests in your hands, don’t offend your developer with a bevy of proposal requirements and a ridiculously low budget. Also, you may be ready to start working on your new project tomorrow, but a busy developer likely has to juggle a full roster of other clients jostling for his attention. Don’t insist on an extremely tight lead time, and don’t act like you know everything. Remember, you’re partnering with an expert for a reason—they know what it takes to get the job done right.

Once you’ve drafted your RFP, take some time to customize it for each web designer you contact. A template RFP may provide a smart starting point, but you don’t want to spam 12 different companies with your request and sit back on your laurels. Instead, aim to initiate a conversation about what you’re looking for, and use your RFP to crystalize your wants and needs. By taking this approach, you’re bound to find a development partner who will work diligently to bring your vision to life.

Web Design 101: Using Color to Boost Conversions

Most small business owners don’t give the color of their website much thought—after all, a design’s visual appeal is most important, right? In fact, your site’s design should extend far beyond appearance, by incorporating colors that can land you more sales. If you’re not already familiar with colors role in design and how it can alter the perceptions of your buyer, learn how you can utilize colors to boost your online conversions.

Why Does Color Matter?

Colors evoke emotions and subconscious responses from consumers. Yellow and orange tones project happiness and optimism, while most buyers see blue as trustworthy and dependable. In addition to these general ideas, different target groups vary in their color preferences. For example, many female buyers don’t like orange and brown, while men don’t like purple. A few simple color changes can make or break a company’s branding and marketing initiatives.

Finding the Best Color for Conversions

A number of detailed case studies have taken a closer look at color on the web, in an effort to pinpoint which colors help buyers land more sales. Some studies have found that using a red button instead of a green button can produce up to 34% more results. Before you fill your site with red buttons, however, it’s important to understand that color is merely a portion of the conversion equation.

See, while color is undeniably important, it’s even more important to understand your audience. Many case studies and A/B tests have revealed results that seem completely contradictory to one another. That doesn’t mean that one color is necessarily better than the other, it simply means the site’s visitors respond better to one option in a particular case. Confused yet?

How to Realistically Choose the Right Color

Is color one of the most important elements of a website’s design? Yes—and yet, even the most talented marketers in the world are split on the best ways to implement color. As Unbounce points out, there is no single button shape, size, or color that will work perfectly in every situation. Instead, try to use colors that stand out and don’t be afraid to experiment to find the right fit.

Choosing the right colors for your website’s design is no easy process, and unfortunately, there are no definitive answers you can apply across the board. Don’t be discouraged, however. Treat your site like an ever-evolving tool to help you better market your business. Experiment wildly and see what you’re able to produce. If you have the resources to do so, consider testing different designs and colors to see what resonates best with consumers. Above all else, know your buyer—with a clearly defined target audience in mind, you’ll be better able to gauge a visitor’s response to your business site.

Sam’s Six: SEO Podcasts.

Sam’s Six: SEO Podcasts.

Economist Radio.

Not specifically for SEO, but having a general grasp on economic trends is incredibly useful for thinking about abstract SEO concepts. Because of the rapid nature of technology, it is useful to pay attention to general business trends. With new developing technologies like blockchain, augmented and virtual reality, and autonomous machines it is good to be on the forefront, and in the know. SEO is all about having that preemptive edge.

My only gripe is that you have to be particularly engaged to get the most out of this podcast. The Economist is a rather stuffy.

This podcast can be accessed without an economist magazine subscription via Spotify and Apple Music.

 

Secret Sauce

Secret Sauce is a podcast tailored to those doing SEO for the restaurant and hospitality industry. The podcast is produced and narrated by James Eling veteran restaurant SEO for the website: www.marketingforrestaurants.com. Since West 54 Media has many clients in this sector, Secret Sauce is invaluable. If you are in the restaurant and hospitality market, this is the podcast for you. Eling said, “only people with problems use Google.” Blew my mind with truth.

 

The Digital Marketing Podcast.

With a name like that, how could you ignore this one? This podcast is put on by www.targeinternet.com, a website that gives online SEO classes. These episodes go into detail of common SEO woes and questions. Each episode is premised around a single topic, so if you really want to get into depth, this a great podcast, also it is not as boring as you might think. It is narrated well by award winging Daniel Rowles, and Ecommerce expert, Ciaran Rogers.

 

Planet Money – NPR

In the same vein as the Economist Radio, this podcast is not specifically an SEO podcast, it is a general economics podcast. However, I have gotten so many fresh ideas from these guys. Wildly entertaining, strangely funny, and surprisingly profound at times, this is one of my favorite podcasts in general. It is a nationally syndicated radio show, so the content is timely and produced well. Since NPR is partially government subsidized you are in a way already paying for it, so why not listen?

Freakanomics Radio – NPR

See Planet Money. Freakanomics radio is similar but often takes a much more micro approach to economics. Also, there is a bit more social and political examination. Not recommended if you have staunch beliefs.

TED radio hour – NPR

If you couldn’t tell, I am an NPR junkie. If you are not aware of TED talks, which would surprise me if you weren’t. TED Talks cover the latest in business, tech, science, and social sciences. I have said it already and I hold firm, you can get SEO tips about direct questions, but thinking about SEO in the abstract is going to be better in the long term.

 

Wondering about how to maintain your brand identity in this brave new world? See this article by West 54 Media.